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Product Reviews

Reviewer:
Tanjo3000
Reviews:
0
Votes:
3 (67% helpful)

Page 1 of 0

  1.  Don't be fooled when you get it

    Posted: 

    When I received my switch today I first looked at the information on the packaging and saw no mention of 3D support, only "high performance and speed up to 2.5 Gbps". As I had specifically needed 3D support I was a bit disappointed to see no mention of 3D when the product description here on Play.com does.
    I was going to write a complaint but thought I had better test the switch first to be sure my complaint was right. I plugged in my PS3 through the switch and went straight to my collection of 3D photos taken with my 3D camera then switched to 3D mode. My 3D TV detected the mode change and behaved as it should.

    The build quality is not all that great and the packaging/instructions need updating. If I was judging based on those I would have scored it 3 stars. But it comes with a remote control for switching and does not use any external power supply, both of which are not featured in many more expensive 3D capable HDMI switches. For that I give it 4 stars.

    You get what you pay for when it comes to the quality but it does the job intended and without taking up yet another power outlet. I would recommend this to anyone :)

  2.  Size matters

    Posted: 

    After reading other customer reviews I decided to set the record straight regarding the reduction in size.

    The size reported of 16GB is the total unformatted size. Formatting is done as a simulated floopy disk style where a disk has tracks and sectors. Each track has formatting information as do each sector. Each disk also uses a sector for telling the OS how the disk is structured, how much space is on it and how many sectors are used per file block. Then there are all the sectors used to tell the OS where all the files start and where the parts of the files are stored on the disk. The file storage data is also duplicated!

    All this information needs actual physical data space too. So with a 16GB drive, all this formatting data and OS system data takes up the 1.2GB that users see as missing from the 16GB specified.

    Flash drive manufacturers use the correct method for calculating the overall size based on binary (base 2 maths). So 16GB is 16x1024MB, 1MB = 1024KB etc.

    Unfortunately, harddisk (HD) manufacturers use the misleading 1GB = 1000MB etc. which makes the size of the HD seem higher than it actually is, so you generally see a bigger drop in size once a HD is formatted because the OS reports the size based on 1GB = 1024MB etc.

    I hope this clears up any misunderstanding.

  3.  Size matters

    Posted: 

    After reading other customer reviews I decided to set the record straight regarding the reduction in size.

    The size reported of 16GB is the total unformatted size. Formatting is done as a simulated floopy disk style where a disk has tracks and sectors. Each track has formatting information as do each sector. Each disk also uses a sector for telling the OS how the disk is structured, how much space is on it and how many sectors are used per file block. Then there are all the sectors used to tell the OS where all the files start and where the parts of the files are stored on the disk. The file storage data is also duplicated!

    All this information needs actual physical data space too. So with a 16GB drive, all this formatting data and OS system data takes up the 1.2GB that users see as missing from the 16GB specified.

    Flash drive manufacturers use the correct method for calculating the overall size based on binary (base 2 maths). So 16GB is 16x1024MB, 1MB = 1024KB etc.

    Unfortunately, harddisk (HD) manufacturers use the misleading 1GB = 1000MB etc. which makes the size of the HD seem higher than it actually is, so you generally see a bigger drop in size once a HD is formatted because the OS reports the size based on 1GB = 1024MB etc.

    I hope this clears up any misunderstanding.

  4.  Size matters

    Posted: 

    After reading other customer reviews I decided to set the record straight regarding the reduction in size.

    The size reported of 32GB is the total unformatted size. Formatting is done as a simulated floopy disk style where a disk has tracks and sectors. Each track has formatting information as do each sector. Each disk also uses a sector for telling the OS how the disk is structured, how much space is on it and how many sectors are used per file block. Then there are all the sectors used to tell the OS where all the files start and where the parts of the files are stored on the disk. The file storage data is also duplicated!

    All this information needs actual physical data space too. So with a 32GB drive, all this formatting data and OS system data takes up the 2.1GB that users see as missing from the 32GB specified.

    Flash drive manufacturers use the correct method for calculating the overall size based on binary (base 2 maths). So 32GB is 32x1024MB, 1MB = 1024KB etc.
    Unfortunately, harddisk (HD) manufacturers use the misleading 1GB = 1000MB etc. which makes the size of the HD seem higher than it actually is, so you generally see a bigger drop in size once a HD is formatted because the OS reports the size based on 1GB = 1024MB etc.

    I hope this clears up the misunderstanding.

  5.  Why bother?

    Posted: 

    Anti-glare features are usually built in to LCD monitors and the anti-radiation was only of use with old CRT (Cathode Ray Tube) monitors which do not produce any more radiation than old CRT television sets and we did not see filters for those! If you have an old CRT monitor then the anti-glare may be useful to you. Otherwise, do not bother!