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Product Reviews

Reviewer:
Alatriste
Reviews:
0
Votes:
51 (92% helpful)

Page 1 of 0

  1.  Rosebud...

    Posted: 

    That opening phrase is famous throughout cinema history, it's so famous it was referenced in the Simpsons ( season 5)

    Seriously though, this has to be one of the greatest, most gripping, involving, mysterious films ever made. There simply is no film existing today that could compare to the elegance, technicality, performance and even arrogance of Citizen Kane. Orson Welles' direction was instrumental, displacing his notoriously difficult working habits for the fact that this made his career.

    It tells of one Charles Foster Kane, a rich media tycoon whos' life is riddled with unfulfillment, his attempts to fill his life with materialistic objects simply leaving him all the more empty.

    Essentially, this film is about loss, and in Kanes case, his childhood. I make it sound corny, but believe me when I say that Citizen Kane starts with the denouement and learns its' beginnings when it's too late.

  2.  Zimmer IS Pirates.

    Posted: 

    This goes beyond saying 'sounds like'. This is 'Classic' Zimmer. When I first listened to this, a week before the movies release,I couldn't escape sheer epic sound that Zimmer creates.In essence, he makes Pirates work,with Jack's main theme,the idea behind which is that Jack has envisaged his own myth,and has created his own theme music to accompany it! there is richness here, yet little development or departure from the earlier films themes-even Sao Feng's tune sounds a little stale.

    Saying that 'I Don't Think Now is the Best Time' is surely the best soundtrack piece ever.It covers the entire Last Battle in the Maelstrom...right up to whatever happens to Beckett(don't want to spoil it for anyone)and is just a visualless movie in itself.Fantastic.

    Aside Zimmer's fetish for bravado brass, overly syconpated and singular sounding strings,it is actually FUN listening to this soundtrack,whereas some only survive with their symbiote of sight, this stides ahead with an entirely 'big' sound and thoroughly enjoying ambiguity.

  3.  What Controversy?

    Posted: 

    I remember reading about the split opinion it had in the states, but I cannot fathom how this movie is considered as anything less than a masterpiece.Who cares if you don't understand the theme of existential love through eternity? just enjoy this film for the fact that Darron Aronofsky made it!

    If you strip it down, it has three storlyines that are constantly intertwined, each with a reminiscient feel, both in visuals,as well as the basic theme of love.

    I personally treasure the fact this gem wasn't recognised fairly as I relish the thought of it being mine, a favourite to a select few.I myself bawled my eyes out at the cinema with my girlfriend when we saw it(as did a few other reviewers)and it is to that emotional extent I believe it not only to be MY favourite film, but also THE Greatest Motion Picture Ever Made

  4.  Pixar...For the Bigger Kids!

    Posted: 

    A little warning:do not buy this book as a bedtime story for the kids.It's in-depth stuff, but boy you feel like a kid reading it!

    This great book takes all 8 recent pixar movies(and future releases)and analyses every aspect of making and playing with these movies that their creators obviously love like their own children.
    With really in-depth information on pixar's top boffins like John Lasseter and Ed Catmull, especially interesting was the insights into how hellish working for Disney was in the 80's (with it's belief that computers would replace animators altogether!) There is something for everyone here, not just movie geeks.

    Another interesting point to note is that John Lasseter, the booming voice of Pixar who brought Toy Story to us, started as a shy,closeted animator for Disney...but he soon gained confidence during his part-time summer job as a road sweeper at Disneyland!

    It may not go as deep as explaining how to successfully render Buzz's face, but it's a invaluable tome and really impressing portfolio from one digital movie company that HASN'T had a bad release. The way Pixar is going, you can see why Paiks writes so enthusiastically, in effect...she names them 'The Best', and she isn't lying.

  5.  Youv'e got to Love it Really...

    Posted: 

    On May 19th 2005,Lucas delivered his closing chapter to cinema's greatest saga.And boy did he deliver.

    Now let's consider the cynic's views first:yes there is far too much CGI, the acting is desireabley challenging and writing rather wooden...but consider ye of little faith:the CGI is jaw droppingly audacious and in most cases-unnoticeable, the acting's always been crap, and remember this was Lucas's space 'opera',it's meant to be melodramatic!

    This movie joined up both parts of the story nicely,leaving the audience in doubt of any new hope for the future. It also clearly shows how much a baddie Vader is,slaughtering everything in the last half hour of the film...the only drawback to this is come Episode IV,it's a bit difficult watching him be babysitter to the oldie Grand Moff Tarkin.

    I always end up choosing this episode over the others, no one should resist the awesome performance of Ewan McGregor when the final confrontation between himself and Anakin begins...and ends.

  6.  The Book that should have been a Movie...

    Posted: 

    This movie tome compilling eveything you need to know about movie effects(and probably some you don't)is simply fascinating.To any film fan,casual or addicted there is something for eveyone.

    It starts with a brief(about 100 pages)history of effects houses and the early start of cinema,from the lumiere's Trip to the Moon you begin to get a sense of the art behind what seems like nothing but techno-wizardry nowadays. Who would have thought that people would run screaming out of a cinema in 1896 because they thought a train was 'coming out of the screen'!

    Simpler times...but this book goes far beyond the ordinary...it tells you HOW to do these effects,not condemning effects to the vagueness of featurettes on summer blockbusters today.

    My favourite thing here is Rickitt's ability to tell it like it is, yes he can get a bit in-depth when discussing multi-compositing green screen elements,but doesn't hide the fact that movies and their awe-inspiring effects are made to do one thing...rake in the dosh from the punters. For this reason I believe it to serve as both a instruction manual and enjoyable read.

    I would like to see a volume 2 on the horizon,with effects analysed from movies like Transformers, POTC and Ghostbusters(how did they make Slimer slimy?!)

    P.S.Try the 'Vertigo' Hitchcock shot,it's so easy you can do it on your mobile!

  7.  This Is The Original Beowulf

    Posted: 

    I came across this dvd in Poland,and couldn't believe it hadn't been released...worse again,I had never heard of it!

    With both Stellan Skarsgard(Bootsrtap Bill-Pirates of the Caribbean)and Gerard Butler(300) as leads, I was shocked to find that this 'european' film wasn't recognised as a result of the forthcoming mo-cap Beowulf made by Hollywood!What garbage!
    This film exhibits the struggle of King Hrothgar Lord of the Danes against an ogre whom is picking his people off one by one....that is the basic outline,and if your worried about being bogged down literary mumbo-jumbo, don't be, everything is conveyed simply enough similar to LOTR.

    Gerard Butler lets his Scottish accent rip in this,and Im proud of it. In fact everyone speaks a certain slang...apart from the muse who is bloody annoying anyway. In this regard, it's fresh as it moves away from the shakespearean toffness of Lord of the Rings.

    Don't get me wrong, it isn't as good as peter jacksons masterpiece, but it will be a damn sight better than whatever hollywood will produce.

  8.  Don't Tell Me You Haven't Seen Them?!

    Posted: 

    Probably one the greatest characters as well as the most iconic in cinema history,Spielberg's and Lucas's collaboration proves they are a force to be reckoned with.

    Each part of this trilogy tells a unique story and although there have only been 3 movies(as of yet) it feels the legend and mythology behind Indiana Jones could fill 30 movies!

    GET THIS BOXSET!

    And remember May 22nd 2008 for Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull to make it a billion!

  9.  Greatest Boxset Ever

    Posted: 

    When Toy Story came out in 1995, when I was 6, I was mesmerised by the sheer visualisation of inanimate objects. A Bug's Life in 1997 was the next step...everything up to 2006's Cars was a success for pixar, and rightly so.I don't see these film's as simply aimed at kids, but more for anyone whoever imagined something impossible.
    That's what Pixar does, create the impossible, and with amazing results for cinema history.

  10.  As Good As The Movies Themselves...

    Posted: 

    With each pixar movie,they release an animated short that's played before the main feature in the cinema. From the 1986 Luxo Jnr,to 2006s' One Man Band, each short showcases the famous studios abilities in the arena of digital animation.

    In my mind,all thirteen animated short movies are as important to the development of cinema as the films themselves