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Product Reviews

Reviewer:
Londonclanger
Reviews:
0
Votes:
13 (62% helpful)

Page 1 of 0

  1.  Utterly dreadful - stick to the original

    Posted: 

    Where to start with this...? Some things really are best left alone, and this "re-imagination" of the seminal 70s record really is a prime example. Liam Neeson just can't cut it as the Narrator (a tough job when you're up against the great Richard Burton) and some of the new dialogue is just plain awful (the emotion isn't there - esp. the Atilleryman). As for the music, over produced digital effects ruin the original. It really is terrible. I was so disappointed. Stick the original.

  2.  A real Hammer gem from 1968

    Posted: 

    Not often seen on TV this little gem from the masters of horror that is Hammer films is a wonderful tale. What starts off as a rather interesting character piece about a tramp steamer making a get away from an African port, soon morphs into full-blown sci-fi as the ship, crew and passengers find themselves marooned in lost continent with killer seaweed, hungry giant crustaceans and murderous Spanish conquistadores. All-in-all a minor classic that needs to be seen to be believed.

  3.  6 Hits and a Miss

    Posted: 

    Quite frankly, a penny under a tenner for these films is remarkable. "The Incredible Shrinking Man" is regarded as a cult classic in its own right and is worth the money on its own IMHO. The other selections are great - from interstellar reaches of This Island Earth, to the swamps of the Black Lagoon and interspersed with fear, monsters, frights and suspense of the other films. And all the films are great for repeated viewing. Obviously, modern day tastes mean the frights aren't as in-your-face, but the subtle use of music and suspense more than makes up for this.

    I have to wholeheartedly agree with another reviewer that Them! - with the marvellous giant ants - would have made this a truly majestic boxset. And for that I have taken a star away.

  4.  Detailed and well written

    Posted: 

    This is a very detailed and extremely well written account of the Jig Sector of Gold Beach during the Normandy Landings in June 1944. It includes background information on the German defences and clearly guides the reader through the Allied planning and actual assault.

    The book then covers the day itself, from naval bombardment through the first wave assault and the issues and problems they faced. The book intertwines the history of the events with first hand witness accounts and details teh progress of the various regiments as they attempt to reach and nullify their objectives.

    The book contains numerous photos (some of which I had not seen before) and well annotated maps. This is a fantastic addition to anyone book shelf. Highly recommended.

  5.  Nothing new here

    Posted: 

    Purely for the Orb completists this one. Nothing on here you can't find on other releases. Feels like another attempt to wangle a few pennies by repackaging the same old choons. Seems the Orb do this quite regularly now, having done 'Delux' versions of the albums which generally again offer little more to the original (and again are for the Orb completists really). I'd recommend you buy either of the first two albums instead.

  6.  Worth a viewing - just

    Posted: 

    The 1970s saw a plethora of doomsday/ecological disaster sci-fi films hit the movie screens - most were complete tosh, some on the money (check out Silent Running), one or two were classics (Dark Star). The Omega Man, the second filming of Richard Matheson's classic novel of fear and vampirism "I Am Legend" starts off well - there's really something about a deserted American city, the long vistas up arrow straight streets and a lone car driving (if you ignore the obvious mistakes of other people and other cars you can see...) and the obvious solitude.

    Unfortunately the fork between the quite brilliant novel and the film then begin. In of itself the film isn't too bad apart from 'The Family' and its techno-hating medieval babble. Heston plays Heston (when didn't he) and is of course as wooden as a crate but if you haven't seen this movie then it's worth seeing for the first five minutes alone.

    It's the weakest attempt of the three versions of the book that have been made and I'll be one of the dissenting voices and say that the Will Smith version isn't all that good either (the latter half a complete waste of a promising start). When someone finally makes I Am Legend as it was written we'll have a classic.

    So, in summary The Omega Man is worth checking out. The book is definitely worth reading.

  7.  Mesmerizing

    Posted: 

    This is surely the best DVD of the Apollo moon landings. Rather than the razzmatazz of other films this gem of a documentary tells the story through film with voice-overs from the astronauts. Set to haunting music by Brian Eno this is a masterpiece and worth buying a multi-region DVD player in itself.

    You need to turn the lights down or off and let yourself sink into this film. You get pulled along by the sheer enormity of what was happening. For someone barely born when Neil Armstrong set foot on the lunar surface this film is the closest you'll get to reliving the fantastic occasion that was Apollo.

    It's so good that at times you could almost cry at the majesty of what you're seeing. Should be made compulsory viewing.